Results For Articles or Consultants

Agency - Company Disputes

Rick Hammond

I serve as the Principal of Insurance Claims and Litigation Consultants, LLC, a firm that provides expert witness services and testimony on claims and lawsuits involving insurance coverage, bad faith, underwriting, agent-broker liability, regulatory issues and good faith claims handling practices. I also provide consultation and oversight of pre-suit and litigated coverage matters that potentially…

Mike Stroman

R. MICHAEL STROMAN SUMMARY R. Michael Stroman has over 42 years of experience in the insurance industry. Currently serving as an industry consultant, he assists insurance purchasers, insurance companies and agents, and their attorneys, accountants, and other industry advisors, with agency management, claims consulting, underwriting practices, standard of care, and other technical assistance. Mr. Stroman…

Dr. Brenda Powell Wells

Brenda Powell Wells holds both a Bachelor of Business Administration and a Ph.D. in Risk Management and Insurance from the University of Georgia.  She holds the Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriter (CPCU), Accredited Advisor of Insurance (AAI) and Construction Risk Insurance Specialist (CRIS) designations.  She also holds a graduate certificate in Business Analytics from East…

Amy E. Johnson

Richard Faber

Richard Faber is a highly experienced insurance professional who possesses a wide array of skills and a distinctive combination of experience, ranging from marketing, and consulting to managing/underwriting a staggering array of  risks. His background and extensive experience work together to make Richard a much sought after authority in his field. Richard began his career…

THE DANGERS OF ABSOLUTE EXCLUSIONS, AND WHY ARE REGULATORS ALLOWING THEM?

“IN 2010, I authored an article on the dangers of absolute exclusions.1 That article was prompted by an appellate decision in Florida, James River Ins. Co. v. Ground Down Eng’g, 540 F.3d 1270 (11th Cir. 2008). In that case, an engineering firm that was providing consulting services on whether land had become polluted found that its errors and omissions (E&O) policy, which covered it as an environmental consultant, didn’t cover pollution!”

Thomas Quaka

Scott S. Margraves

EXPERT WITNESS | COVERAGE ANALYSIS As the Principal Consultant of Gulf Coast Risk Management, I have over twenty-seven years of “hands-on” experience in the insurance industry and a Certified Insurance Counselor (“CIC”) since 1999.  Nationally recognized as one of the top insurance professionals in the United States in leadership and dedication to the insurance profession,…

Property & Casualty Insurance Procurement & Litigation (Ten Things Every Lawyer Should Know)

6. The insurance application process now requires more attention.
There was a time, in the not too distant past, when most applications for property and casualty insurance did not require the signature of the insurance buyer. Agents routinely completed applications and underwriters readily accepted them without anyone’s signature on the application. This custom and practice is no more. Insurance applications have become more than just tools to gather underwriting information to determine the eligibility of the applicant for coverage and for premium determination purposes. The necessity for thoroughness and precision has greatly increased. It is more than appropriate and appreciated by the underwriter for the applicant to provide supplemental answers and explanations along with the standardized application. These relatively recent changes in the usual and customary practices of making an application for insurance can make the difference between having a claim covered and not having it covered. An ambiguity or misunderstanding can become an allegation of misrepresentation, which can lead to no coverage at all, rather than just a possible increase in premiums. Policy rescission and voiding policies ab initio are on the rise, along with underwriters using application information as “Warrants” thereby making the application a part of the policy (which has always been the case with life insurance policy applications).
These developments make providing accurate information to underwriters more than just important. Accurate information becomes the basis for the existence of the contract itself and adds an increased threshold to the concept of “utmost good-¬‐faith” which is the traditional basis of all insurance relationships. However, “utmost good-¬‐faith” is a two-¬‐way street. Insurance companies sometimes attempt to deny coverage based on conditions and exclusions that are not, and never were intended, appropriate to the situation or the claim at hand. Some prohibitions were intended to exclude coverage because the hazard is better transferred by another type of policy, not to be used to exclude an otherwise covered claim. This type of unfair claims settlement practice is rare and usually caused by poor attention to detail in the filing of a claim and/or inexperienced claims adjusters. The insurance buyer needs to be equally diligent and vigilant as to the accuracy of applications of insurance and in the filing of a claim under an insurance policy.

Lesson: Insurance applications are more important than they once were. Plan and prepare in a careful, thorough manner before submitting an application for insurance or filing a claim.

Areas of Expertise