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Cyber Risk & Insurance

Cyber Risk & Insurance

While cyber threats have been a concern for more than a decade, the last eighteen months have been marked by a number of large-scale cyber breaches. These breaches caused companies and insurers to expend considerable financial resources to recover from the breach and mend their damaged public images. As a result of the increase in cyber threats, public and private entities are scrambling to ensure the security of their systems and the information and data these systems store. As part of the risk management analysis presented by cyber threats, companies of all sizes are evaluating their existing insurance policies to understand what, if anything, traditional insurance policies will cover with respect to cyber claims. In most instances, obtaining additional
cyber coverage, either through special endorsement to existing policies or through a stand-alone cyber liability policy, is necessary.

Scott E. Bushnell

Mr. Bushnell is a Certified Public Accountant with over 20 years of experience providing Forensic Accounting services through national and global professional services firms. Know as the “numbers guy” his professional expertise covers Business Interruption Claims, Economic Damage Analysis, and Fraud Investigations. Mr. Bushnell has advised clients in mediation, arbitration and appraisal as a third…

Damian J. Arguello

Risk management & insurance thought leader & influencer, law professor, coverage counsel, & insurance expert witness.

Agents – Your E&O Coverage May Be For More Than You Think

Your responsibility to not breach your fiduciary duties to the principal (insurer) are a large part of your professional /ethical responsibilities and the reason for your E&O coverage as an insurance agent… and here you thought the Insurers demanded that you to carried E&O was only for the policyholde’s protection. 

AAIMCo Members Featured in latest CLEW Newsletter

•Wrongful Designation by Thomas M. Braniff, JD, CPCU and Robert P. Gaddis, JD;
•The Essential Bookshelf for Expert Witnesses by Kevin Quinley, CPCU, ARM, AIC;
•The 411 on Becoming an Expert Witnesses by Elise M. Farnham, CPCU, ARM, AIM, CPIW;
•Working as an Expert Witnesses by Douglas R. Emerick; and
•“Be Careful What You DON’T Ask For” By Bill Wilson, CPCU, ARM, AIM, AAM.

Contingent Business Interruption Claims, What Happens When the Loss You Experience is Not Your Own?

In today’s business climate more focus is placed on lean operations. This trend is becoming increasingly more commonplace as corporations are divesting of business lines and returning to core competencies. As decentralization continues to grow and corporations are relying on supply and sales agreements with non-related parties, the impact of a supplier or customer’s loss on a business’ operations increases substantially.

A Review of the Modern Claims Made Form

“Since its creation, “claims made” wording’s use has expanded outside of the “profession” and professional liability realm, finding use in diverse liability coverages. But the roots of “claims made” wording, and its most common use still, is found in covering the exposures created by a “professional’s” activities. As seen by the list of true “professions,” professionals are individuals who provide a service to society which, if done poorly, could cause extreme or irreparable personal or financial harm. …

The expansion of claims made policy forms beyond “professions” caused the basic “claims made” concept to diverge and evolve into two distinct forms. One evolutionary branch commenced in professional liability coverages (known also as “errors and omissions” coverages in this series) and the second branch grew out of the financial services industry and the need for directors and officers liability protection, fiduciary liability and employment practices liability (referred throughout this series as “executive liability” coverages).

Although both branches attach to the tree at the same point; greatly different “claims made triggers” have resulted. Additionally, coverage terms, conditions and definitions differ between the two branches.”

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